Indiana residents with teens who have recently become licensed drivers should know about the 100 deadliest days. This refers to the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day when the number of deaths arising from teen driving crashes goes up. Teens, inexperienced as they already are, can become more reckless over the summer since school is out and partying becomes a regular part of life.

According to AAA, the 100 deadliest days between 2008 and 2018 resulted in over 8,300 deaths in crashes involving teen drivers. A recent Traffic Culture Safety Index illustrates the kind of negligent behavior that teens engage in. Among respondents aged 16 to 18, 47% admitted to driving 10 miles over the speed limit in residential areas. Thirty-five percent admitted to texting, and 32% reportedly ran red lights. Seat belts were not worn by 17% of respondents.

To prepare for the 100 deadliest days, parents can do a number of things with their teens. It all starts with raising awareness of the hazards and instilling safe behaviors. Parents know, of course, that actions speak louder than words, so they themselves should be safe drivers. There should be a set of family rules when it comes to driving. Parents could also consider coaching their teens during practice driving sessions; AAA recommends at least 50 hours of this.

This sort of preparation can reduce the chances of an accident and, with it, the chances of a personal injury case arising. As for those who were injured at the hands of a negligent teen driver, they may file their claim and, provided that the claim is a strong one, hopefully recover a fair amount in compensatory damages. It might be a good idea to have a lawyer assist with the case. The lawyer may speak on behalf of an injured person at the negotiation table or in the courtroom.